From Queer Spy to Community Organizer: Fighting for Justice in Many Forms

Before joining the staff of Carolina Jews for Justice as one of our new statewide community organizers, Cole Parke spent five years working as the LGBTQ & Gender Justice Researcher at Political Research Associates, a Boston-based think tank dedicated to researching, exposing, and interrupting the Right Wing. Of the many insights gained during their tenure at PRA, one lesson that repeated itself over and over again was this: it's all connected. The Christian Right's attack on LGBTQ people and reproductive justice is fundamentally linked to the antisemitism, anti-Black racism, and Islamophobia fueled by White Nationalists. During a recent presentation at Judea Reform Congregation in Durham, NC, Cole discussed these connections and the imperative for greater unity across the many struggles for justice. What follows is an adaptation of their remarks from April 5, 2019.

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CJJ supports the Holocaust Education Bill

April 2, 2019

Carolina Jews for Justice supports the Holocaust Education Bill (HB 437), and affirms Holocaust education as a necessary part of opposing antisemitism, white supremacy, and intertwined systems of oppressions. We stand at a liminal moment, when soon there will be no living Holocaust survivors to share their experience firsthand. A major atrocity is moving from memory to history, and we see it as a moment to ask publicly: what is our role in remembering and teaching about genocide, fascism, and violent nationalism?

The Torah shares a story of the Israelites at a similar historical junction. As the Israelites prepare to build a society after slavery in Egypt, God issues what seems like a paradoxical commandment regarding the Amalekites, who were oppressive enemies of the Jews and are often representative of systemic antisemitism. God orders us to “Blot out the memory of Amalek from under heaven. Do not forget!” For centuries Jews have asked how we can possibly erase the memory of our oppressors but not forget it?

Today, Carolina Jews for Justice understands that the cycles of oppression that repeat and damage us and our allies are interrelated, and we must both end and learn from them. We can never forget the Holocaust; indeed, it was a tragedy that irrevocably and permanently changed what it means to organize against antisemitism. We know its memory still hurts us when neo-Nazis march in Charlottesville and swastikas are spray-painted on our places of worship. Every single member of our society should learn the clear lesson of the Holocaust: that antisemitism can erupt with massive deadly consequences. But we also say that blotting out the legacy of the Holocaust alone – fighting against neo-Nazis, but not Islamophobia, teaching about Nazi genocide, but not about white supremacy – is not enough. We are given a two-part commandment: to erase and to remember. CJJ applauds this effort permanently to include Holocaust education in our state’s curriculum, and we also name this as one step on a path we are excited to keep walking with our allies. At the end lies a time when we will have blotted out the name of our shared oppressors, and when we will remember the ways we each brought our specific histories to help fight collective enemies.  

CJJ Born Perfect NC Statement

Carolina Jews for Justice is proud to partner with the Campaign for Southern Equality and Equality North Carolina in the Born Perfect NC campaign. We stand staunchly opposed to conversion therapy and all other forms of anti-LGBTQ violence and discrimination. We affirm and honor the LGBTQ members of our Jewish community, and stand as Jewish allies with all LGBTQ people in our state. As part of our pursuit of justice in North Carolina, we seek a state that celebrates gender and sexual diversity, and where no one attempts to deny or alter anyone’s sexual orientation or gender identity.

A centuries old Jewish understanding of the biblical creation story envisions the first humans not as a heterosexual couple, Adam and Eve, but as one mixed, intersex being. The rabbis wonder why God would create the first human this way, and decide that it must be so no human can claim that people of their sex, gender, or heritage were created before others. The rabbis go on to say that while a human king stamps his face on hundreds of coins and they all look the same, God stamps God’s image on every human, and we all come out differently, yet still reflecting godliness. These Jewish teachings make it clear: all humans are born with equal worth, inherent and permanent, regardless of gender or sexual orientation.

We urge our General Assembly to pass the pro-LGBTQ bills introduced through the Born Perfect NC campaign. From a place of Jewish values, of human ethics, and of justice, we call for a legally affirmed welcome extended permanently to all LGBTQ North Carolinians.